Vet In Pataskala | Animal Hospital of Pataskala https://pataskalavet.com/ Tue, 06 Dec 2022 23:06:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=6.1.1 COVID-19 Pandemic Update https://pataskalavet.com/covid-19-pandemic-update/ https://pataskalavet.com/covid-19-pandemic-update/#respond Fri, 20 Mar 2020 10:43:17 +0000 https://pataskalavet.com/?p=532 COVID-19 Pandemic UpdateDear Valued Clients,We at the Animal Hospital of Pataskala want you to know that our patients, owners, and staff mean the world to us. In light of the current health crisis, we pledge to contantly evaluate the risks associated with the treatment and care of your beloved pets. Currently we have no plans [...]

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COVID-19 Pandemic Update

Dear Valued Clients,

We at the Animal Hospital of Pataskala want you to know that our patients, owners, and staff mean the world to us. In light of the current health crisis, we pledge to contantly evaluate the risks associated with the treatment and care of your beloved pets. Currently we have no plans to close or limit our hours, however these unprecedented times call for additional precautions to protect our clients and staff from the threat of COVID-19.

  • We have increased our awareness and cleaning routines as suggested by health care professionals. We are stressing the importance of hand washing, disinfecting work and public areas several times a day, and wiping down surfaces in exam rooms after every appointment.
  • We have asked our staff to stay home if they show signs of any illness and are being aggressive with COVID-19 testing.
  • To provide social distancing, we are encouraging you to call ahead and prepay for needed medications and supplies. Those medications can then be delivered to your car in the parking lot by a staff member. All medications need to be picked up during regular buisness hours.
  • When you arrive for appointments, please STAY IN YOUR CAR and text 740-217-4448 or call 740-927-0196 to let us know you have arrived. One of our staff will then contact you either via phone or come to your car to assist you. At this time, our waiting room is CLOSED. When it is time for your appointment, you will have the option to remain in your car while your pet is taken inside, or up to two people may accompany your pet in to the exam room while wearing a mask.

We hope these precautions will help to keep our clients and staff as safe as possible, however we also need help from YOU!

  • If you have an appointment, but feel ill, PLEASE STAY HOME.
  • If you feel your pet’s need is urgent and you feel ill, CALL FIRST. If we determine your pet needs to be seen, an appointment will be scheduled. Upon arrival STAY IN YOUR CAR and call our office. A staff member will come out to your car and bring your pet in while you wait in the car. We would be happy to call you while we perform your pet’s physical exam.
  • We love our pets like family, however during this crisis, please REFRAIN FROM KISSING YOUR PET. While there are only rarely reported cases of COVID-19 in pets, they can still carry the virus from one person to another-including our staff.

Thank you for taking the time to read this important information. We will continue communications through emails, our website, and Facebook posts.

As always, if you have any questions please contact us during business hours at 740-927-0196 or text us to 740-217-4448.

Sincerely,

Dr. Justin Harris

DVM, owner of Animal Hospital of Pataskala

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The Tick Risk: 5 Diseases Your Pet Can Catch from Ticks https://pataskalavet.com/the-tick-risk-5-diseases-your-pet-can-catch-from-ticks/ https://pataskalavet.com/the-tick-risk-5-diseases-your-pet-can-catch-from-ticks/#respond Thu, 29 Aug 2019 17:39:32 +0000 https://pataskalavet.com/?p=485 Ticks aren’t only icky, they can carry diseases that are dangerous to you and your pet. Although you can take preventive measures, the truth is, pet owners cannot 100% prevent tick bites. Diseases caused by microorganisms passed through tick bites, such as Lyme, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, and hepatozoonosis, can affect any dog [...]

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Ticks aren’t only icky, they can carry diseases that are dangerous to you and your pet. Although you can take preventive measures, the truth is, pet owners cannot 100% prevent tick bites. Diseases caused by microorganisms passed through tick bites, such as Lyme, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, ehrlichiosis, anaplasmosis, and hepatozoonosis, can affect any dog or cat, whether they stay inside or only go into the backyard. Ticks have been reported in nearly every U.S. state, although they are more common in the eastern U.S., and can live in any grassy area, making them impossible for the most well-intentioned owner to avoid. Following are five diseases ticks can transmit to your furry friend.

1: Lyme disease

The most diagnosed and well-known tick-transmitted disease, Lyme disease is transmitted by the deer tick, and has been diagnosed in many U.S. states and southern Canada. Lyme disease signs include fever, joint swelling, lameness, lethargy, and depression and can progress to potentially fatal kidney failure. Fortunately, the disease can easily be diagnosed with a blood test and treated with a long course of antibiotics, and there is a vaccine available. So far in 2019, nearly 5,000 dogs in Ohio have tested positive for Lyme disease, so ask our team if the Lyme vaccine would be a good choice for your dog.

2: Rocky Mountain spotted fever

Rocky Mountain spotted fever, another well-known tick-borne disease that affects both animals and humans, is carried by several tick species and found all over the U.S., despite its regional name. General signs include fever, lack of appetite, and joint pain. Neurologic signs, such as wobbliness or weakness, may also be seen. Although no specific test exists, certain bloodwork abnormalities may suggest infection. Treatment is a course of antibiotics and supportive care.

3: Canine ehrlichiosis

Ehrlichiosis has been defined as a disease only relatively recently, but is prevalent worldwide and carried by several species of ticks. Signs are similar to those of other tick-borne diseases, such as fever, lack of appetite, lethargy, and bloodwork abnormalities. Often owners see a bloody nose or bruising as the first disease sign. Symptoms start one to three weeks after infection, and dogs who are promptly treated can fully recover. Ehrlichosis does have a chronic form, and is harder for pets who aren’t diagnosed until later in the disease progression to overcome. Diagnosis can be made through a blood test, and treatment is a course of antibiotics and supportive care.

4: Anaplasmosis

Carried only by the black legged tick, anaplasmosis is linked to  phagocytophilum and platys, two specific U.S. bacteria. Anaplasmosis signs aren’t as extreme as other tick-borne diseases, but can include bleeding abnormalities. Diagnosis can be made through a blood test, and treatment is an antibiotics course.

5: Hepatozoonosis

Spread by the Gulf Coast tick in the southern and warm coastal U.S. areas, American canine hepatozoonosis is the most serious on this list of tick-borne diseases. Unlike other tick-borne diseases where the microorganism is transmitted via a tick’s saliva, hepatozoonosis is contracted when a pet ingests an infected tick, either through self-grooming or hunting. The disease cannot be transmitted to people, but can be fatal for the infected pet. Signs include extreme pain, unwillingness to stand, muscle wasting, anemia, and fever. Unfortunately, no cure exists, and infection is considered a lifelong condition. For animals who receive early treatment and have a low parasite load, remission is possible, but for those who have a long-term infection, and/or a high parasite load, relief may not be possible, and may be fatal.

Arming yourself with knowledge about tick-borne diseases and their signs is important, because ticks cannot be completely avoided. Therefore, always check your pet regularly for ticks if you live in or visit a tick-infested area, both to protect your pet and to avoid bringing ticks into your home. The less time a tick is embedded in your pet, the less time it has to transmit a debilitating disease. Flea- and tick-prevention products are available—contact our hospital to discuss the right tick preventives for your pet.

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Coughing Up the Facts on Canine Influenza https://pataskalavet.com/coughing-up-the-facts-on-canine-influenza/ https://pataskalavet.com/coughing-up-the-facts-on-canine-influenza/#respond Tue, 13 Aug 2019 17:14:14 +0000 https://pataskalavet.com/?p=478 There’s currently a canine influenza outbreak on the West Coast, and, like last year, it’s expected to race like wildfire across the country. Since canine influenza is a fairly new disease, many pet owners are unsure what to do. As with all influenza viruses, strains mutate easily and cross from species to species—an earlier strain [...]

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There’s currently a canine influenza outbreak on the West Coast, and, like last year, it’s expected to race like wildfire across the country. Since canine influenza is a fairly new disease, many pet owners are unsure what to do. As with all influenza viruses, strains mutate easily and cross from species to species—an earlier strain (H3N8) had risen from an equine flu strain, and the current avian flu-derived strain (H3N2) can also infect cats. Fortunately, there has been no evidence that either strain can infect humans.  

How is canine influenza spread?

Canine influenza is highly contagious and spreads rapidly in kennel, grooming, boarding, or shelter situations. The virus is transmitted through aerosols or droplets containing respiratory secretions from barking, coughing, or sneezing. Close quarters and inadequate disinfection techniques encourage transmission, as the virus can travel on people or objects that have come into contact with an infected pet. Kennels, food and water dishes, leashes, and bedding can indirectly spread canine influenza, as can people wearing infected shoes or clothing. 

You should disinfect surfaces and yourself after coming into contact with a suspicious pet who may be carrying the influenza virus, which can survive up to 48 hours on surfaces, 24 hours on clothing, and 12 hours on hands. Disinfection is critical in halting the spread of disease. After exposure to an infected pet, your dog will often show respiratory signs in two to three days.

What are the signs of canine influenza?

Canine influenza infects almost every exposed dog, with approximately 80% developing signs of disease. The other 20% of infected dogs who do not exhibit signs can still spread the virus. Respiratory signs are common with influenza infections, and canine influenza is often confused with other diseases that are part of the canine infectious respiratory disease complex, such as canine infectious tracheobronchitis, distemper, parainfluenza, herpesvirus, and canine adenovirus 2. If your pet is suffering from canine influenza, she will likely display these respiratory issues:

  • Soft, moist cough or dry cough lasting for 10 to 21 days, despite cough suppressants and antibiotics
  • Sneezing
  • Discharge from the nose or eyes
  • Lethargy
  • Decreased appetite

As dogs progress past the mild stage, they may develop pneumonia and display a high-grade fever and increased breathing rate and effort. Although most dogs recover from the more serious stage of canine influenza, some die from the H3N2 strain. Canine influenza is more likely than other respiratory infections to turn into pneumonia, and is especially risky for flat-faced breeds, puppies, and senior pets. 

How is canine influenza diagnosed and treated?

Pets with a suspicious cough or other respiratory signs indicative of canine influenza are highly contagious and should be treated as such until a diagnosis is made. We ask that you call our office when you arrive for your pet’s appointment to ensure we escort you directly to an exam room to limit contamination. 

Canine influenza can easily be confused with other respiratory diseases, so a definitive diagnosis cannot be based on clinical signs alone. If we suspect your dog has canine influenza, we will collect samples to send to a diagnostic laboratory for confirmation. 

Once we’ve reached a canine influenza diagnosis, treatment for your pet is mostly supportive care, as with most viral diseases. Most dogs recover in two to three weeks with proper nutrition and care. Additional support may be necessary if your dog develops a secondary bacterial infection, pneumonia, or dehydration. Isolate your pet and other dogs in your household for four weeks to prevent the spread of infection. 

How can I prevent my dog from getting canine influenza?

Since canine influenza is a highly contagious disease, practice good hygiene and avoid areas where outbreaks are known. In addition to washing your hands and disinfecting cages, dishes, and bedding that have come into contact with infected pets, stay away from dog parks, boarding facilities, grooming parlors, and animal shelters where disease has been found. You can also help protect your pet with vaccinations for both strains of canine influenza, which may reduce your pet’s risk of disease but is not a foolproof guarantee. However, although vaccination may not completely prevent illness, it can reduce the infection severity and duration.

Has your furry friend been hacking enough to produce a doggy hairball? Or, have you noticed watery eyes and a runny nose? At the first sign of a respiratory illness, give us a call to help your pet squelch her sniffles.

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